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#1 10.10.2016 14:06:18

Nie-junmen
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Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

"Музыкой навеяло" (с)

В целом, информацию можно оценить даже в сравнении с тем, что было издано генштабами ряда стран по горячим следам войны, в т.ч. в России.

Но, как часть истории и особый социальный и культурный феномен, это может быть интересно.

Только вопрос - объемы текста адовы и даже простая коррекция плохо распознанного текста вызывает излишнюю трату времени. Будем переводить с английского на русский (соответственно, с других языков предпочтительно, т.к. японским, китайским, немецким владеют далеко не все)?

Для начала - Los Angeles Herald, Volume 42, Number 162, 20 September 1894:
http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&am … 940920.2.4

Текст проверен мною и откорректирован. Но пока без перевода.

DOWN GOES THE DRAGON.
Another Crushing Chinese Defeat.
The Japanese Victorious on Land and Sea.
A Terrific Naval Battle at the Month of Yalu River.
Two Formidable Fleets in Action for Six Hours
Heavy Losses on Both Sides
Each Claims the Victory

By the Associated Press. Shanghai, Sept. 19.—Dispatches from Corea announce that the first battle between modern ships of war has taken place on the Yalu river, north of the Gulf of Corea, and both sides claim a victory. The Chinese squadron, it appears, was covering the landing of a large force of troops destined to reinforce the Chinese army operating against the Japanese in Corea. According to one account the Chinese succeeded in landing the troops, but in an engagement which followed with a Japanese fleet, the Onion or the Chen Yuen of the Chinese fleet was sunk. The Chao Yang and Yang We are reported to have been ran ashore and burned. Three Japanese ships are also said to have been lost. Admiral Ting, commander of the Chinese northern fleet, and Colonel von Hannekin, formerly aid ’de-camp to Viceroy Li Hang Chang, are reported to have been killed in the engagement. Colonel yon Hannekin was the German officer who was on board the transport Kow Shing when sank by a Japanese cruiser with the loss of about 1000 men. Another report says the Japanese succeeded in preventing the landing of the Chinese troops, and, therefore, the Japanese claim the victory. It is added, however, that the Japanese lost (on warships and the Japanese fleet was compelled to retreat, after basing suffered heavy losses in killed and wounded. The Chinese fleet, it is also sai4 has returned to Wei-Hai-Wei. The second report says Admiral Ting and Col. von Hannekin were not killed, but severely wounded.

DETAILS OF THE BATTLE. London, Sept. 19. — In a battle between Chinese and Japanese fleets, on the Yalu river, at least one Chinese vessel and three Japanese warships were destroyed. The Japanese are supposed to have accomplished their object in prevention the landing of Chinese troops in Corea to reinforce the Chinese operation against the Japanese. On the other hand, the Chinese claim to have defeated the Japanese fleet. A dispatch to the Times from Tien Tsin today says the hostile fleets met yesterday at the mouth of the Yalu river, where the Chinese were disembarking troops. The Japanese fleet commenced the attack at noon and the battle lasted until 6 p. m. The Chinese lost five snips. The Chen Yuen wad sunk, the Kiang Yuen was burned, and the Chao Yuen and Yang Wei were stranded and partly burned. The Chin Yuen, a Chinese vessel which was engaged in the fight July 27th, escaped and is supposed to be safe. The dispatch to the Times also agrees in saying the Japanese are supposed to have lost three ships, and it adds many Chinese were killed and wounded, among the latter being Admiral Ting, Colonel von Hannekin and Captain Tyler, the two latter being volunteers. The Times correspondent confirms the statement that the Chinese were successful in landing troops.

LATER DISPATCHES. London, Sept. 19. — A dispatch received here from Shanghai, dated 7:45 p.m. today, says that later dispatches say that 12 Chinese warships arrived yesterday at Port Arthur for repairs. The dispatches say that on Monday last the Chinese fleet, consisting of 14 war ships, arrived off the month of the Yalu river, convoying transports having on board 6000 troops. It was the intention of Admiral Ting to disembark the troops at the mouth of the Yalu river, in order to form a force with which to intercept the Japanese advance upon Moukden, Manchnria, from which there is a railroad running to Tien Tsin. While engaged in landing these troops, according to this dispatch, a fleet of 19 Japanese warships, accompanied by a fleet of torpedo boats, approached the river. As soon as they were within range the Japanese attacked the Chinese. Then followed a terrible conflict lasting six hours, during which the great guns, rapid-firing guns and machine guns and all sorts of guns were used with fearful effect on both sides. Both fleets also used torpedoes repeatedly and tired at each other continuously from the rapid-firing guns mounted in the tops of the different warships.

BOTH SIDES CLAIM VICTORY. London, Sept. 19 — A dispatch filed at Shanghai at midnight says that the Chinese claim that they defeated the Japanese fleet. It is added, however, that this claim is not entirely endorsed by the correspondent at Port Arthur, which lies across the gulf of Corea from the scene of the engagement. He says he has seen some of the officers who took part in the battle, md that they evidently did not believe their fleet had been victorious. Some had a dozen of Japanese warships > 'it into Port Arthur. All were badly damaged and fall of wounded men. It will require considerable time to make the vessels serviceable.

MEETING OF THE FLEETS. The Chinese northern squadron, under the command of Admiral Ting, left Port Arthur last Friday night, having under convoy seven transports. All the troops on board the transports were Hunanes, most of them infantry. There were also a number of artillerymen, with their batteries on board. Several Europeans accompanied the fleet. The object of the expedition was to land troops near Wiju, whence they were to be sent to the front. Nothing was seen of the enemy until the mouth of the Yalu river was reached. Then a fleet of war ships was reported to be in sight and bearing down upon the Chinese squadron. Signals were hoisted on the Chinese flagships ordering the transports to make all possible speed for a place of safety. Signals were also set for the Chinese fleet to clear tor action. This order was promptly obeyed. In the meantime, the Japanese squadron was coming up rapidly, making for the Chinese vessels. The transports had run in toward shore and hurried preparations were made to send the troops ashore. Many of them were landed before the battle commenced.

OPENING OF THE ENGAGEMENT. The Chen-Yuen, one of the most powerful vessels in the Chinese navy, fired a shot at the Japanese as soon as the latter came in range of the guns. The fire was promptly returned, and soon the Chen-Yuen was hotly engaged with two large Japanese cruisers, one of which is said to have been the Chi-Yoda. The other Japanese vessels got into the position they desired, and the tight then became general. For six hours the battle was waged furiously, the deep boom of the great guns commingling with the sharp reports of the rifles. Nearly all the vessels on both sides were engaged for the whole six hours.

CHINESE VESSELS SUNK. The cruiser Chin Yuen took a prominent part in the engagement. Her Krupp and Armstrong guns were well served and she poured hot and well sustained fire from her auxiliary batteries. One of the Japanese vessels discharged a torpedo at her. The missile aped well from its tube and struck the Chin Yuen fairly. When it exploded it was apparent it had done great damage, for the Chin Yuen began almost immediately to settle. Her crew, however, stuck-to their guns and delivered some effective shots before the vessel sank. The belted cruiser King Yuen met a similar fate, being struck with a torpedo and sinking shortly afterward. Many of the crew of both vessels went down while standing at close quarters. Only a few on board were saved, and it is reported that 000 officers and men were drowned by the foundering of the two vessels.

OTHER VESSELS DESTROYED. After the Chin Yuen and the King Yuen bad gone down, the cruiser Yang Wei and the Chao Yung ran aground while maneuvering for position. They were helpless, and a 'destructive fire was poured into them from the big guns of the Japanese, Some of the Japanese warships devoted themselves for a time to the transports, which had no time to get out of range. It is believed several of the transports were sunk, including one from which the troops had not been landed. It is estimated the total Chinese lose in killed and wounded is 1500. It is reported the Japanese loss was 1000 killed and wounded. Up to the time of sending the dispatch, it was impossible to learn the name of the Japanese vessel the Chinese allege was destroyed in the engagement.

THE CHIN YUEN SUNK. The latest advices from Shanghai seem to establish the fact that it was the Chih Yuen that was sunk by the Japanese, and not the Chen Yuen, as some of the earlier reports had it. The Times will tomorrow publish a dispatch from Shanghai stating the so-called cruiser Tsi Yuen, which was attached to the Chinese northern squadron, was one of the Chinese vessels attacked by the Japanese fleet off the mouth of the Yalu river, but that she was for some reason, not stated in the dispatch, sent out of the action. The dispatch shows that if Admiral Ting and Colonel von Hannekin were wounded during the engagement their injuries must have been slight, far it is how said they both have resumed their places aboard the Chinese fleet. It is added the Japanese occupied Ping Yang on Monday.

NO JAPANESE SHIPS LOST. Shanghai, Sept. 19. — A dispatch received here from Yokohama says: No Japanese vessels were lost in the engagement in the Yalu river. The Japanese warships Matsushima and Yoshe and the transport Saikiomaru were engaged, but to what extent the dispatch does not state. There was great loss of life on both aides.

LI HUNG DID NOT SUICIDE. London, Sept. 20. — A Times special from Berlin says the statement that Viceroy Li Hung Chang had committed suicide in consequence of the reverses that had been met by the Chinese army and his degradation in consequence, is denied here. As a matter of fact, he communicated yesterday with the Chinese legation in this city.

THE JAPANESE ADVANCE. New York, Sept. 20. — A dispatch from Shanghai says: Field Marshal Count Yagamata, commanding the forces in Corea, is marching with 45,000 Japanese troops on Moukden from the southeast. The treasure captured at Ping Yang amounted to $3,000,000.

CONFIRMATORY NEWS.
The State Department Apprised of the Defeat of the Chinese. Washington, Sept. 19. — The confirmatory news received today by Secretary Gresham of the defeat of the Chinese by land and sea, with the further notice that telegraphic communication between Corea and Pekin has been cut off by the Japanese, is taken here as evidence that the Chinese forces are iv a miserable plight. The small remnant of an army in Corea is out off from reinforcement by sea, as a result of the defeat of the Chinese fleet at the mouth of the Yalu river; they cannot communicate with their own government by wire, and as their escape from the Corean peninsula by the northern overland route is prevented by the Japanese, their surrender appears to be inevitable. The Japanese, therefore, are now in force on the border and coast of their enemy, and an early transfer of the scene of war from Corea to China is looked for by army officers, unless the movement should be prevented by the early advent of winter. Military experts believe that as soon as the remaining Chinese troops in Corea have surrendered, the Chinese will transport the main body of their troops by Sea from Ping Yang to the Manchurian coast, and making a rapid advance on Moukden, the capital of the province, will soon be in a position to organize a campaign on Pekin itself. It is believed here that the Chinese forces are almost demoralized, and that the only obstacle to the triumphant campaign of the Japanese apart from the inclement winter of Northern China, is lo be looked for in the interference of the great powers.
There is reason to believe the feeling is growing in Europe that the war bids fair to go beyond bounds unless some influence is brought to bear to check it, and some nations having large interests in China have taken the alarm already. They fear the result on their own interest of so overwhelming a victory by Japan, that must be followed by the domination of Japanese interests, and animated by commercial territorial jealousy, they are seeking a way to terminate the war. Secretary Gresham today received three cablegrams from the seat of war in the Orient. One from Minister Denby reads: “Naval engagement off North Corea, 17th. Five Chinese and three Japanese vessels reported destroyed. Fleet at Port Arthur”. Another from Minister Denby dated yesterday, reads: “Telegraphic communication between Pekin and Chinese army Corea cut off by Japanese”. The other dispatch, from Minister Dunn at Tokio, was as follows : Tokio, Sept. 19. — Following received from United States minister at Seoul: “Please cable department Chinese army totally annihilated at Ping Yang”.

Если есть русские газетные материалы - очень будет интересно посмотреть.

Как говорится, EVERYBODY WELCOME! *HI*

 

#2 10.10.2016 14:42:35

Nie-junmen
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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Вот аналогичная информация из другой газеты - различия, в основном, только в наличии иллюстраций (подписи к ним внизу, сами иллюстрации копировать не могу да и не вижу смысла):
San Francisco Call, Volume 76, Number 112, 20 September 1894
http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&am … 940920.2.2

FIGHT AT SEA.
Both Sides Claim a Victory.
HOSTILE FLEETS MET Off the Mouth of the Yalu River.
STORIES DO NOT AGREE Except That Both Suffered Heavy Loss.
JAPANESE THREATENING PEKING
That Is the Object of the Move Toward the City of Mukden.

Shanghai, Sept. 19. — Dispatches from Korea announce that the first battle between modern ships-of-war has taken place on the Yalu river north of the Golf of Korea, and both sides claim a victory. The Chinese squadron, it appears, was covering the landing of a large force of troops destined to re-enforce the Chinese army operating against the Japanese in Korea. According to one account the Chinese succeeded in landing the troops, hut in the engagement which followed with the Japanese fleet the Chin Yuen escaped, the Chen Yuen of the Chinese fleet was sunk, the Kiang Yuen burned, and the Chao Yang and Yang Wei are reported to have been run ashore and were burnt.
Three Japanese ships are also said to have been lost. Admiral Ting, commander of the Chinese northern fleet, and Colonel von Hannekin, formerly aid-de-camp to Viceroy Li Hung Chang, are reported kilted during the engagement. Colonel von Hannekin is a German officer, who was on board the transport Kow Shing when it was sunk by the Japanese cruiser, with a loss of about 1000 men.
Another report says the Japanese succeeded in preventing the landing of Chinese troops, and therefore the Japanese claim a victory. It was added, however the Japanese lost four warships and the Japanese fleet was compelled to retreat after having suffered heavy losses in killed and wounded. The Chinese fleet, it is also said, has returned to Wei Hai Wei.
A second report says Admiral Ting and Colonel von Hannekin were not killed, but severely wounded.

FRIGHTENED THE EMPEROR. The Desires to Take Matters into His Own Hands. London, Sept. 19. — A battle between the Chinese and Japanese fleets on the Yalu river has been fought, and at least one Chinese vessel and three Japanese warships were destroyed. The Japanese are supposed to have accomplished their object in preventing the landing of Chinese troops in Korea to re-enforce the Chinese operating against the Japanese. On the other hand, the Chinese claim to have defeated the Japanese fleet.
A dispatch to the Times from Tientsin to-day says the hostile fleets met yesterday at the mouth of the Yalu river, where the Chinese were disembarking troops. The Japanese fleet commenced the attack at noon, and the battle lasted until 5 p. m. The Chinese lost four ships. The Chen Yuen was sunk, the Kiang Yuen was burned and the Chao Yung and Yang Wei were stranded and partly burned. The Chin Yuen, the Chinese vessel which was engaged in the fight of July 27, escaped, and is supposed to be safe. The dispatch to the Times agrees in saying that the Japanese are supposed to have lost three ships, and it adds many Chinese were killed and wounded, among the latter being Admiral Ting, commander; Colonel von Hannekin and Captain Tyler, the two latter being volunteers. The Times correspondent confirms the statement that the Chinese were successful in landing troops. Great consternation prevails in the palace in Peking The Emperor has decided to take the management of affairs into his own hands, but the Government officials oppose such a course, which, they declare, is beneath his dignity.

MOVING AGAINST PEKING. That Seems to Be the Objective Point of the Japs. London, Sept. 19. —  A dispatch received here from Shanghai, dated 7:45 P. M. today, says that later dispatches say that twelve Chinese warships arrived yesterday at Port Arthur for repairs. The dispatches say that on Monday last the Chinese fleet, consisting of fourteen warships, arrived off the mouth of the Yalu River, convoying transports having on board 6000 troops. It was the intention of Admiral Ting to disembark these troops in through the mouth of the Yalu river in order to form a force with which to intercept the Japanese advance upon Mukden, Manchuria, from which there is a high road running to Tientsin and Peking.
While engaged in landing these troops, according to this dispatch, a fleet of nineteen Japanese warships, accompanied by a fleet of torpedo-boats, was seen approaching the river. As soon as they were within range the Japanese attacked the Chinese. Then followed a terrible conflict, lasting six hours, during which the great guns, rapid-firing guns and machine guns and all sorts of guns were used with fearful effect on both sides. Doth fleets also used torpedoes repeatedly and fired at each other continuously from the rapid-firing guns mounted in the tops of the different warships.

CHINESE CLAIM VICTORY. Upon What Ground Does Not Appear From the Facts. London, Sept. 19— A dispatch filed at Shanghai at midnight says that the Chinese claim that they defeated the Japanese fleet. It is added, however, that this claim is not entirely indorsed by the correspondent at Port Arthur, which lies across the Gulf of Korea from the scene of the engagement. He says he has seen some of the officers who took part in the battle and that they evidently did not believe their fleet had been victorious. Some half a dozen Chinese warships put into Port Arthur. All were badly damaged and full of wounded men. It will require considerable time to make the vessels serviceable.
The Chinese northern squadron, under the command of Admiral Ting, left Port Arthur last Friday night, having under convoy seven transports. All the troops on board the transports were Hunanese, most of them infantry. There were also a number of artillerymen with their batteries on board. Several Europeans accompanied t lit; fleet. The object of the expedition was to land the troops near Wiju, whence they were to be sent to the front.
Nothing was seen of the enemy until the mouth of the Yalu river was reached. Then a fleet of warships was reported to be in sight and bearing down upon the Chinese squadron. Signals were hoisted on the Chinese flagships ordering the transports to make all possible speed for a place of safety. Signals were also set for the Chinese Fleet to clear for action. This order was promptly obeyed. In the meantime the Japanese squadron was coming up rapidly, making direct for the Chinese vessels.
The transports had run in toward shore and hurried preparations were made to send the troops ashore. Many of them were landed before the battle commenced.
The Chun Yuen, one of the most powerful vessels in the Chinese navy, fired a shot at the Japanese as soon as the latter came in range of her guns. The fire was promptly returned, and soon the Chen Yuen was hotly engaged with two large Japanese cruisers, one of which is said to have been the Chiyoda.
The other Japanese vessels got into the positions they desired and the Sent then became general. For six hours the battle was waged furiously, the deep boom of the great guns commingling with the sharp report of the rifle. Nearly all the vessels on both sides were engaged for the whole six hours.
The splendid cruiser Chih Yuen took a prominent part in the engagement. Her Krupp and Armstrong guns were well served, and she poured a hot and well sustained fire from her auxiliary batteries. One of the Japanese vessels discharged a torpedo at her. The missile sped well from its tube and struck the Chih Yuen fairly. When it exploded it was apparent that it had done great damage, for the Chih Yuen began almost immediately to settle. Her crew, however, stuck to their guns and delivered some effective shots before the vessel sank. The belted cruiser Kang Yuen met a similar fate, being struck with a torpedo and sinking shortly afterward. Many of the crews of both vessels went down while standing at close quarters. Only a few on board were saved, and it is reported that 600 officers and men were drowned by the foundering of the two vessels.
After the Chih Yuen (not Chin Yuen) and the Kiang Yuen had gone down the cruisers Yang Wei and Chao Yung ran aground while maneuvering for position. They were helpless and a destructive fire was poured into them from the big guns of the Japanese.
Some of the Japanese warships devoted themselves for a time to the transports which had not time to get out of range. It is believed several of the transports were sunk, including one from which the troops had not been landed. It is estimated the total Chinese loss in killed and wounded is 1500. It is reported the Japanese loss is 1000 killed and wounded.
Up to the time of sending the dispatch it was impossible to learn the name of the Japanese vessel that the Chinese allege was destroyed in the engagement
The latest advices from seem to establish the fact that It was the Chin Yuen that was sunk by the Japanese and not the Chen Yuen, as some of the earlier reports had it.
The Times will to-morrow publish a dispatch from Shanghai stating that the so called cruiser Tsi-Yuen, which was attached to the Chinese Northern squadron, was one of the vessels attacked by the Japanese fleet off the mouth of the Yalu river, but that she was for some reason not slated in the dispatch sent out of the action.
The dispatch shows that it Admiral Tine and Colonel von Hannecin were wounded during the engagement their injuries must have been very silent, for it is now said they both have resumed their places aboard Die Chinese fleet. It is added that the Japanese occupied Ping Yang on Monday.

MARCHING ON MOUKDEN. Thus Begins the Japanese Advance Upon Peking. NEW YORK, Sept. 20. — A special dispatch from Shanghai says: Field Marshal Count Yagamata, commanding the forces in Korea, is marching with 45,000 Japanese troops on Mukden from the southeast. The treasure captured at Ping Yang amounted to $3,000,000.

LI STILL ALIVE. Has Not Committed Suicide Because of Disgrace. London, Sept. 19. — A Times special from Berlin says the statement that Viceroy Li Hung Chang had committed suicide in consequence of reverses that had been met by the Chinese army and his degradation in consequence is denied here. As a matter of fact he communicated yesterday with the Chinese legation in this city.

JAPS HAVE NO SHIPS. This Is the Story That Comes From Yokohama. Shanghai. Sept 19. — A dispatch received here from Yokohama says: No Japanese vessels were lost in the engagement in Yalu River. The Japanese warships Matsushima and Yoshe and the transport Saikiomaru were engaged, but to what extent the dispatch does not state. There was great loss of life on both aides.

OFFICIAL ADVICES. The Great Powers Are Likely to Take a Hand Now.

Washington, Sept. 19. — Secretary  Gresham today received three cablegrams from the seat of war in the Orient. One from Minister Denby, dated today, reads: “There was a naval engagement off the north of Korea on the 17th. Five Chinese and three Japanese vessels are reported destroyed. The fleet is at Port j Arthur”.
Another from Minister Denby, dated yesterday, rends:
“Telegraphic communication between Peking and the Chinese army in Korea has been cut off by the Japanese”.
A dispatch from Minister Dunn at Tokio, was as follows:
Tokio, Sept. 19. — The following has been received from the United States Minister at Seoul: “Please cable the department that the Chinese army was totally annihilated at Ping Yang”.

The confirmatory news received today by Secretary Gresham of the defeat of the Chinese on land and sea, with the further notice that telegraphic communication between Peking and Korea has been cut off by the Japanese, is taken here as an evidence that the Chinese forces are in a miserable plight. The small remnant of an army in Korea is cut from re-enforcement by sea as a result of the defeat of the Chinese fleet at the mouth of the Yalu River; they cannot communicate with their own Government by wire, and as their escape from the Korean peninsula by the northern overland route is prevented by me seizure of the mountain passes by the Japanese, their surrender appears to be inevitable.

The Japanese, therefore, are now in force on the bonier and coast of their enemy, and a transfer of the scene of war from Korea to China is looked for by army officers, unless the movement should be prevented by the early advent of winter. The military experts believe that as soon as the remaining Chinese troops in Korea have surrendered the Japanese will transport the main body of their troops by sea from Ping Yang to the Manchurian coast, and making a rapid advance on Mukden, the capital of the province, will soon be in a position to organize a campaign on Peking itself. It is believed here that the Chinese forces are almost demoralized, and that the only obstacle to the triumphant campaign of the Japanese, apart from the inclement winter of Northern China, is to be looked for in the Interference of the great powers. There is reason to believe that the feeling is growing in Europe that the war bids fair to go beyond bounds unless some influence in brought to bear to check it, and some nations having large interests in China have taken the alarm already. They fear the result on their own interests of so overwhelming a victory by Japan that must be followed by the domination of Japanese interest and animated by commercial territorial jealousy they are seeking a way to terminate the war.

THE MIKADO REVIEWING HIS TROOPS (BY A NATIVE ARTIST)
The following is the translation of the Japanese inscriptions upon above drawing counting from right to left: The Emperor reviewing his troops at Aoyama. Drawn by Yoshin-Shenyen. Printed in the 21 year of Mei-je on I8/4. Published in the 21 Year of Mei-je 25/4. Printed and published by 1 Yokoyama Ristachi at the 12 Street of Tsukiya in the Shitaya District. [Seal.] – Pall Mall Budget

THE TSUNG-LI-YAMEN, OR CHINESE COUNCIL OF MINISTERS: Chang. Liu. Shui-Tan. Prince Ching. Shui. Suane. [New York Recorder].

 

#3 10.10.2016 14:54:25

Nie-junmen
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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Помимо всего опубликованного в печати, обе воюющие стороны активно распространяли графическую продукцию.

Так, сражение у Ялу оказалось представлено так со стороны японцев:
http://s018.radikal.ru/i528/1610/67/b79b25630605.jpg

И так - со стороны китайцев:
http://s018.radikal.ru/i510/1610/0f/d966908047e3.jpg

Справедливости ради следует отметить, что китайски лубки предназначались на 99,9% для неграмотных жителей Поднебесной, и тут уж их пропаганда преуспела - например, Гомбожаб Цыбиков, путешествуя по Тибету в 1899-1902 гг., узнал, что все жители Тибета считают, что в войне Китая с Японией победил Китай.

 

#4 10.10.2016 16:46:30

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Кое-что ценное - N.-C. DAILY NEWS, THURSDAY , 18th October, 1894.

THE WAR. THE NAVAL FIGHTS: INTERVIEW WITH MR. G. HOFFMANN.

Mr. G. Hoffmann, who was on board the Tsiyuan during the fight off Yashan, on the 26th of July, and at the battle near the Yaloo on the 17th September, is now in Shanghai on his way home, having resigned his position as Chief Superintending Engineer in the Chinese navy. Yesterday he was seen by a representative of the N.-C. Daily News, to whom he gave some interesting information concerning the fights in which the Tsiyuan had taken part.
In regard to the encounter of the 25th of July it is important to note that he distinctly states that the Japanese were the aggressors, three Japanese vessels meeting the Tsiyuan and opening fire without giving any notice, although war was not declared until the 1st of August. The Tsiyuan and Kuangyu left Yashan at about half-past four on the morning of the 25th of July, shaping a course for Weihaiwei. At about half-past eight o’clock Mr. Hoffman’s boy told him that three Japanese vessels were in sight. Looking through the window on the port side he saw the Japanese men-of-war, about 45 degrees to the fore, coming on in single line. The first was the Yoshino, but
the others he did not know. They came on, and as soon as the leader was abreast of the Tsiyuan the three simultaneously opened fire. Everything was then in confusion on board the Tsiyuan, as no preparations had been made for a fight, the sea lashings being on the guns, and no ammunition being up. It was about half-an-hour before the Tsiyuan could return the fire. The Tsiyuan had her steering gear badly damaged, and the two unknown Japanese vessels went off in pursuit of the Kuangyu and Tsaokiang, the latter of which was captured, whilst the former was run ashore. For quite an hour the Tsiyuan fought the Yoshino, compelling the latter to withdraw with a good deal of damage. After effecting some sort of repairs the Yoshino again started after the Tsiyuan, firing some shots which went wide of the mark. At about half-past /50/ twelve the Yoshino came within 800 or 900 yards, and made preparations to discharge a torpedo. Meanwhile the Tsiyuan was circling round at full speed, keeping her broadside from the Japanese vessel, thus rendering futile an attempt to use a torpedo. The Yoshino approached closer still, whereupon the Tsiyuan’s aft gun, 15cm. Krupp, fired three rounds at her, hitting the Japanese vessels near the bridge and inflicting great damage. Upon this the Yoshino drew off towards the shore, and the Tsiyuan resumed her journey to Weihaiwei. Mr. Hoffmann speaks highly of the working of the Tsiyuan, and he thinks it very creditable that she not only escaped from the superior Japanese force but inflicting considerable damage upon the Yoshino as well. There were 13 killed and 23 wounded on the Tsiyuan and it was an unfortunate fact that there was no doctor on board, nor any provision made in the way of bandages.
From Weihaiwei the Tsiyuan went to Port Arthur to repair, remaining there about three weeks.
Mr. Hoffmann’s account of the battle off the Yaloo on the 17th of September is noteworthy as being the first direct testimony we have yet had as to he doings of the Tsiyuan on that day. It will be readily recalled that her commander, Captain Fong, had been decapitated for cowardice on that day, but Mr. Hoffmann’s testimony tends to mitigate the weight of the accusation against the unfortunate officer, if it does not clear him altogether from blame.
Mr. Hoffmann declares that the Tsiyuan fought with courage, and it was not until her fore and after guns were disabled that Capt. Fong withdrew. The only question was whether he withdrew at too early a stage. Mr. Hoffmann says that at about midday on the 17th of September orders were given to get up the anchor, soon after which the Japanese came in sight and the fighting
began. It was soon very difficult to make out what was going on. The Tsiyuan’s guns were being fired very rapidly, and this he believed was the cause of their getting out or order. When about 30 rounds had been fired from the 15-cm. Krupp aft-gun, the carriage went wrong, and the turning gear of the two forward (21-cm Krupp) guns became jammed, so that the platform could not be turned. The Japanese gunners made very indifferent practice, and the Tsiyuan did not receive much damage from them. Thinking he could do no more with his disabled guns, Captain Fong decided to withdrew, and he made the best of his way to Port Arthur, arriving there six hours before the rest of the fleet. His action was soon disapproved of, and when some of the
damage sustained by the Tsiyuan had been hastily repaired, Capt. Fong was ordered to Tailienwan Bay to take the guns off the stranded Kuangchia, in which he did not succeed. Mr. Hoffmann refused to go in the ship in her then /51/ condition, and his connection with her ceased. Seven men were killed on the Tsiyuan during the fight. Though admitting the seriousness of the guns being damaged, Mr. Hoffmann yet believed that Captain Fong made a mistake in leaving too soon. An enquiry was subsequently held into the case, the result of which was that Captain Fong was beheaded. Mr. Hoffmann did not see the execution, but hearing something about it he ran round Fong’s house. When he reached there, Fong had been decapitated. The men of the Tsiyuan stitched the head on to the body, washed and dressed it, and placed it in a coffin.
In the course of conversation Mr. Hoffmann readily admits the serious blow the Chinese navy received in the battle off the Yaloo, although he can hardly believe that the Japanese escaped so lightly as they represent. Though the Chinese vessels that remain form a force to be reckoned with, Mr. Hoffmann regards them as sadly handicapped by the overwhelming strength which the Japanese can bring against them, and for this reason he cannot understand why the Peiyang squadron is not reinforced by the vessels from the South, which would certainly be of some assistance.

 

#5 10.10.2016 22:42:55

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Еще пара корреспонденций англоязычной прессы:

До битвы при Ялу:
Los Angeles Herald, Volume 42, Number 123, 12 August 1894
http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&am … 940812.2.3

ATHE COMBAT DEEPENS.
Great Naval Battle in the Orient. Japanese Assault on Wei Hai Wei Harbor.
Assailants Repeatedly Repulsed by the Chinese.
The Powerful Chinese Pei Yang Fleet Draws Into the Engagement.
One or the hardest fights on Record.

By the Associated Press. Shanghai, Aug. 11. — A dispatch from Chee Foo Bays the Japanese attacked Fort Hamilton (Port Arthur) yesterday evening and were repulsed. A special dispatch from Chee Foo confirms the report that the Japanese fleet attacked the Chinese fleet at Wei Hel Wei yesterday morning and were repulsed at one entrance to the harbor, and subsequently attacked at the other entrance. The dispatch says the Japanese made a daring attempt to capture the forts and arsenal at Wei Hai Wey. They attacked in force, four cruisers and some smaller vessels holding the advance. The first shots were exchanged at daylight, but the Chinese were on the alert, and their gunners returned a vigorous fire from the forts. The Japanese apparently expected to take the Chinese by surprise, while the letter’s warships were away, the Chinese squadron, with the exception of some small gunboats and a torpedo boat, baying sailed the day before for another port. The gunboat at the fort kept up such a well-directed fire that the Japanese were unable to enter the harbor. The Chinese torpedo boats were then ordered to advance, and when they did so the Japanese fleet retired. The same fleet of the Japanese attacked the harbor entrance later in the day. The result was not known when ibis dispatch was sent.
New York, Aug. 11.—Shanghai dispatches received here say the second attempt of the Japanese fleet upon Wei Hai Wei has been defeated. Another dispatch says the Pei Yang fleet is engaged with the Japanese fleet and a stubborn battle is being fought. Twenty-one ships are taking part. The Pei Yang Fleet is commanded by Admiral Ting, who is reported to be an excellent naval officer. According to recent advices received here from Shanghai the Pei Yang squadron included the Ding Yuen, flag ship; the Chen Yuen, since reported to have been sunk; the Tsi Yuen, King Yuen, Lai Yuen, Chai Yuen, Yan Wei and Chin Yuen.
The Ding Yuen and Chin Yuen were until recently the most powerful vessels in the east, the British flagship at present alone surpassing them. They were built at Stettin in 1882, and are 74o0 tons displacement and 6000 horse power, equal to a speed of 14 knots, with central armored belt of 14 inches. Their armament consists of four 12-inch Krupp guns in twin mounting, en barbette, with 12 inches of armor protection. The steel projectiles weigh 745 pounds, and the charge of powder is 202 pounds of slow burning cocoa; their perforating power at the muzzle is 20½ inches of armor. In addition they carry two 8-inch Krupp guns, one in the bow and one at the stern, with 11-inch perforating power. They also carry three torpedo tubes and many machine guns on deck and in the tops. The Ding Yuen’s commander is Captain Lew and the commander of the Chin Yuen is Captain Lin, both experienced and trained officers who have served under Admiral Tracy of the British navy in training ships, and more lately under Captain Lang. There are about 350 men as the number of each of these ship’s complements.
The Tsi Yuen is classed as a torpedo cruiser. She was built at Stettin in 1883, but her speed is said to be barely 15 knots. She carries two powerful 8.24-inch guns forward, with a muzzle perforating power of 16.4; one 15-centimetre Krupp and four torpedo tubes. The commander of the Tsi Yuen is Captain Fong, described as a resolute and able man who has received his naval training abroad.
The King Yuen and Lai Yuen are belted 9.5-inch Kruppers, built at Stettin in 1882. They are 2000 tone displacement, have a speed of 16 knots and armed with two 21 centimeter Kruppers en barbette forward; two 25-centimetre Kruppers, being broadside, and two torpedo tubes. The commanders of the King Yuen and Lai Yuen are respectively Captain Len and Captain Keuw, both of whom had some training in the British navy.
The Chao Yuen and Yang Wei are the well known Elswick cruisers. They carry two 25-ton Armstrong guns and have a speed of about 14 knots. Captain Wong commands the Chao Yuen and Captain Lin is in command of the Yang Wei.
The Chen Yuen and Ching Yuen are Elswick built boats of 2300 tons of protective steel decks and a speed of 18 knots. These vessels carry three 21.01 centimetre Kruppers, two forward on a platform and one aft, and two 6-inch Armstrong guns. In addition they each have four torpedo tubes. Captain Tang is in command of the Chen Yuen and Captain Yeh is in command of the Ching Yuen. Both these commanders are described as competent men, especially the latter. These nine men-of-war, comprising the Pei Yang squadron, represent a force of about 2300 men. The officers and men of the Pei Yang squadron received much careful training. The course of training for the Chinese sailors was laid down by Captain Lang and they have all passed through the hands of Lieutenant Bourchier, R. N. N., who bad charge of the recruiting and gunnery departments on shore at Wei Hai Wei. In torpedo training, both at the shore school and afloat, the Chinese seamen were under s British instructor, and it is said that the best results can be looked for during the war from the men so instructed. It is stated that the Chinese make excellent gunners, being fond of their guns and keeping them in good order.
The North China Herald, referring to the fleets of China and Japan in its latest issue received here, says: “It is not uncommon to bear unfavorable comparisons drawn between the Chinese and Japanese officers, to the detriment of the former. There are many capable and energetic men among the officers of the Pei Yang squadron who will stand by their ships and serve them efficiently when need arises. An emergency where the nation and country is at stake will bring out, we are fully persuaded, much latent strength in the Chinese naval officers”.

И после битвы при Ялу:
The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW: 1842 - 1954), Wednesday Oct. 3, 1894
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/13970795#

A STRANGE ACCOUNT OF A NAVAL CAPTAIN.

Of the great naval engagement in which the Chinese twin-screw armour-clad turret-ship Tsiyuen was engaged, little seemed to be known in Yokohama. It was stated that the Japs know the truth, but they would not tell, and that the Chinese could not tell the truth about such a fight if they tried ever so hard. The Japan Gazette, of the 7th ultimo, puts it this way: “The Government proper has probably never hoard the truth about any single thing. But it is curious how accounts differ oven of eye-witnesses, of men on board the Tsiyuen, as to the conduct of the Captain Fong One says he fought his ship bravely, being talon at a disadvantage and wholly unprepared for fighting, and only run away from overwhelming odds, after inflicting some damage on his assailant, another account is that he was hiding in his berth during the action. These opposite stones are from officers who were on board There must have been some fight and soma seamanship too to have enabled the ship to get off, for first her steam steering gear was smashed and then the hand steering, both being unduly exposed through faulty construction, and the ship had to be taken out of action by means of tackles attached to the tiller The repairs to the Tsiyuen are about completed, and the Japanese will perhaps have the chance of another shot at her. But then again it may be under another commander, for there are sinister rumours as to the fate of Captain Fong. He is not hold blameless for passing both the Kowshing and Tsaokiang, after his engagement, without warning them of their fate. They could both have been turned back long before they came in sight of the Japanese fleet, and the Kowshing with her turn of speed could have placed herself behind fortifications before the sun had set. So it is rumoured that poor Fong has to pay for his safety with his head. And very properly too, only it is too good to be true A few examples of the sort, however, would, it is said, vastly improve the fighting quality of the Chinese fleet”.

Обратите внимание на фантастические сведения первой корреспонденции о технике и названиях/фамилиях и высказываемые в этой заметке мнения. Прошу отметить, что самые кривые и косые опечатки (иначе не могло быть - даже в те годы был определенный стандарт транскрипции) я поправил, чтобы было легче читать.

 

#6 11.10.2016 18:27:45

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Еще одно интервью Хоффмана - на этот раз данное шанхайской "China Gazette"

We accomplished the journey (to Tatungkow) in safety, landed the troops, and about 11 o'clock on the 17th ultimo, the whole fleet got up anchor and prepared to return to China.

A short distance outside the month of the river we met the Japanese fleet, and a battle followed which lasted till 5.30 in the evening.

It was the most tremendous fight I had ever dreamt about.

Captain Fong fought the Tsi-yuen with courage and ability.

We had seven or eight men killed on board, and continued firing away as fast as we could until between 2 and 3 o’clock in the afternoon, by which time we were terribly damaged and had to leave the scene of action.

Our large gun aft, 16-c.m. Krupp, was disabled, and the two forward guns had their gear destroyed so that they could not be used, and to all intents and purposes the ship was useless, so Captain Fong decided to get out of the action and make the best of his way to Port Arthur to refit.

The smoke was so dense that no one could see very much of what was going on from the deck, but from time to time we heard that this, that, or the other ship, was gone.

Having left the fight in the Tsi-yuen, I know nothing of my own knowledge about what subsequently happened.

We arrived at Port Arthur five or six hours before the remainder of the fleet, which came in about 8 o'clock.

On the way in we had a collision with another vessel, which sank.

From the injuries to the Tsi-yuen, which are all abaft the stern, I should say the other ship rammed us.

The water poured into the Tsi-yuen in a regular torrent, but we closed the water-tight doors forward and went on safely.

I do not think that the charges of cowardice which have been brought against Captain Fong can be supported for a moment; he fought until his ship was no longer serviceable.

As to the results of the Yalu battle, people on shore, who have been reading telegrams and newspapers, know more about them than people who were on the ships actually engaged in the fight, for the smoke was so thick that one only had a chance of knowing what was going on in his own ship.

И снова момент истины - когда Фан Боцянь бежал с места боя, еще даже не успели утонуть горящие рэнделловские крейсера "Чаоюн" и "Янвэй". И именно "Цзиюань" протаранил один из них, окончательно добив.

Комиссия, о которой упоминает Мак Гиффин, обнаружила течь не в кормовой части, а в носовой...

Но ведь то - комиссия! Она же путает корму с носом!

 

#7 11.10.2016 23:02:21

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Еще одно интервью Хоффмана:
附錄(二) 《華洋通聞》,1894 年 10 月 19 日
CELESTINE EMPIRE, OCTOBER 19, 1894.

THE YALOO NAVAL BATTLE. THE EXPERIENCE OF AN EYE-WITNESS. THE TRUTH OF ABOUT THE CHINESE SAILORS.

There arrived at Shanghai on Wednesday, (the 17th Oct.), a German gentleman who was formerly an officer in the Chinese Imperial Navy, and who was on board, сarrying out his duties on a Chinese war-vessel at the Yaloo River naval battle. A representative of the Shanghai Mercury had the pleasure of an interview with this gentleman on Wednesday afternoon, when he related to the following particulars:─ Mr. Gustaff Hermann Hoffmann, the officer in question, said he first joined the Chinese Navy in 1877. Previously he had served in the German Army in the Crown Prince’s 1st East Prussian Regiment. Up to he had been the Superintendent Engineer on board the Tsi-yuen.

He said that on the 25th of July last the Tsi-yuen, with the Kwang-yü, came from Yashan bound for Wei-hai-wei. When near Shopiaul Island about 8.30 in the morning, three
Japanese Vessels, men-of-war, were sighted. One of which proved to be the Yoshino. The Yoshino came up with the Tsi-yuen and firing commenced from both sides. The other Japanese vessels engaged Kwang-yü, while the third pursued a Chinese wooden-dispatch vessel which had put in an appearance.

At half-past one the Yoshino drew off, and left the Tsi-yuen, which proceeded on her way. The wooden dispatch-vessel was sunk. The Yoshino later approached and recommenced firing. The Tsi-yuen had then been considerably damaged, and had lost 13 men. The Yoshino steamed up very close, as if she was trying to torpedo the Tsi-yuen. As she came closer the Chinese vessel opened fire with her heavy 15 cm. Krupp guns aft, and the Yoshino was badly damaged. At length the Yoshino drew off and turned back.

The Kwang-yü had only small quick-firing guns, and having exhausted her ammunition, she was run aground by the Captain on an island. The Tsi-yuen then returned to Wei-hai-wei, and after a few days, received orders to go to Port Arthur for repairs. At Port Arthur there arrived later the rest of the fleet, the Ting-yuen, Chen-yuen, King-yuen, Lai-yuen, Chie-yuen, Tsi-yuen, Ting-yuen /53/ and Chan-yuen and Yang-wei, with two torpedo boats. These vessels were engaged in transporting troops and convoying transports, troops being taken from south of Port Arthur. On the 15th September, the Tsi-yuen left Port Arthur, and on the 16th the vessel anchored with the rest of the fleet at the mouth of the Yaloo River.

THE YALOO BATTLE

About 11 o’clock that day orders were received from Admiral Ting to steam up and for the fleet to mobilise, as Japanese cruisers had been seen in the vicinity. The Japanese fleet was seen approaching and about noon; the Chinese fleet steamed out to meet the Japanese fleet ─ in a V shaped formation, the flag-ship and Cheng-yuen being nearest the enemy. Admiral Ting and Major von Hanneken were on the flag-ship. At about one or two o’clock the fleets opened fire upon one another. The Japanese advancing in
two parallel lines. That firing continued incessantly on both sides for about three or four hours. Mr. Hoffmann, who was on deck part of the time, could see little of what was going on as the smoke was very dense. But the Chinese firing was steady and undoubtedly effective. The Japanese could make no impression against the two large Chinese ships in the van. When the firing began to ceased and the smoke cleared away, it was found that Chih-yuen and Chêngyeun, were sunk and Yang-wei was burnt and sinking. The Lai-yuen was burnt out aft. About 3 o’clock the Tsi-yuen had all her guns disabled and the Commander, Fong Peh-kien, decided on quitting the scene of battle, and
steamed out of the engagement for Port Arthur. Port Arthur was reached by the Tsi-yuen next morning at 5 30. Eventually the Japanese ships drew off from the Chinese, and the Chinese vessels which were left returned to Port Arthur the day following the engagement at about 10 a.m. There returned of the Chinese fleet that had left:─ the Tingyuen, the Chengyuen, Chinyuen, Tsiyuen and Pingyuen. These ships were at once started to be repaired. Two days later the Tsiyuen, after repairs left to tow the Kwangyü from the island where she had grounded, but was unsuccessful.

Mr. Hoffman left the Tsiyuen before she left on that voyage. Speaking of the Chinese sailors, Mr. Hoffman said the crews of the men-of-war were most good. Many of the officers─even those who had not received European instructions─ were brave and very capable in performing their duties. The reports concerning the Chinese sailors have to be beaten to stick to their posts was all nonsense. They fought well and fearlessly, and Mr. Hoffman saw Chinese gunners stepping up to the guns bravely to supply the places of those who had been killed beside them. The sailors, in the midst of the excitement of the battle, obeyed orders promptly and well. The /54/ firing on the Tsi-yuen was by no means wild; it was steady and must have been terrible effective. There were seven Europeans during the battle, three of whom were engineers. In concluding, Mr. Hoffman was of opinion that the Chinese had excellent naval officers, as far as courage and obedience went; many were good navigators. If the Chinese fleet, the Yangtze, Foochow, and Canton squadrons combined with the reminder of the Northern squadron the Japanese could be easily mastered at sea. Fong Peh-kien, the commander of the Tsi-yuen, who was beheaded for leaving the engagement, was described by Mr. Hoffman as being a courageous and able officer. He had learned his navigation in England where he had also received a thorough training. His ship’s guns were disabled, and it was useless for him to remain in the engagement.

Mr. Hoffman sent his resignation 8 months ago, and should have left the service on the 1st of May last. He proceeds to Germany. He has met a number of Europeans while coming down, who were going to join the Chinese Navy.

 

#8 12.10.2016 17:33:47

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

А вот и китайская пресса - еще одно интервью, взятое у Г.Г. Хоффмана:

Шанхай, «Шэньбао», 19 октября 1894 г. (21-й день 9-го месяца 20-го года эры правления под девизом Гуансюй)

Записки о том, как военный корабль «Цзиюань» дважды участвовал в боях.

По словам некого европейца по имени Хоффманн (Ха-фу-мэнь - прим. А.П.), который находился на борту военного корабля «Цзиюань» и выполнял служебные обязанности, уже прервав контракт и собираясь вернуться в свою страну, он остановился в Шанхае в гостинице «Лича» и давал интервью интересовавшимся ходом военных действий.

«Цзиюань» два раза участвовал в бою и оба раза он (Хоффман - прим. А.П.) находился на борту корабля.

Первый [бой] произошел до того, как было объявлено о начале военных действий между двумя государствами.

Утром [«Цзиюань»] вышел из Асана в сопровождении «Гуанъи» и «»Цаоцзян» (sic!)

Около 9 часов вахтенный сообщил, что вдалеке видны 3 японских корабля, которые приближались на большой скорости.

Одним из них был «Ёсино».

Названия двух других определить не удалось.

Военные действия между двумя государствами еще не объявляли, [их начало] не предвиделось и все были не готовы к такому [развитию событий].

Внезапно японские корабли открыли огонь.

Наши корабли немедленно изготовились и зарядили орудия.

Прошло полчаса, как мы увидели, как японские корабли разделились.

Один завязал кровопролитный бой с нашим кораблем, один – с «Гуанъи», а еще один – с «Цаоцзян».

Началось сражение.

Через некоторое время «Гуанъи» выбросился на берег, а «Цаоцзян» был захвачен.

Наш корабль сражался около часа.

«Ёсино» получил попадание с нашего корабля и на некоторое время вышел из боя, чтобы исправить повреждение в рулевом управлении.

После этого он вернулся и энергично атаковал наш корабль.

Станок одного из орудий нашего корабля был подбит разрывным снарядом и вышел из строя, внезапно испортились механизмы у носовых орудий и мы не смогли дальше сражаться.

Пришлось вернуться в Вэйхай.

В этом бою на борту «Цзиюань» было 13 убитых и 23 раненных и так как к войне не готовились, то по этой причине [на борту] не было корабельного доктора, а также не было взято ни лекарств, ни перевязочных средств.

Поэтому пришлось идти в Вэйхай или Люйшунь, чтобы получить медицинскую помощь и произвести ремонт поврежденных механизмов. 

Так прошел первый бой.

Во второй раз [мы] вели бой в открытом море у [реки] Ялуцзян и наш корабль отважно сражался до последней возможности.

Одно за другим вышли из строя все орудия, подбитые вражескими снарядами.

[Тогда] командир Фан отдал приказ отступить.

В тот день пополудни был получен приказ адмирала сниматься с якоря и выступать.

В скором времени были замечены японские корабли, приближающиеся на большой скорости.

Оба флота открыли огонь из орудий и началось сражение.

Наш корабль вел очень беглый огонь залпами, без остановки, в течение короткого времени, поэтому станки орудий получили повреждения.

Всего из 15 см. орудия было произведено 35 выстрелов, и его механизм был поврежден и [орудие] не смогло двигаться.

У установки 21 см. орудий был поврежден механизм и также вышел из строя лафет, и [орудия] не смогли двигаться.

Командир Фан увидел это и понял, что нужно отступить в Люйшунь.

Через 6 часов один за другим начали подходить все [наши] оставшиеся корабли.

Наш корабль хоть и был поврежден, но не опасно.

Вернувшись в Люйшунь, он встал на ремонт.

По окончании ремонта [«Цзиюань»] вышел в бухту Далянь, чтобы снять артиллерию с корабля «Гуанъи» (sic!), но я не смог отправиться туда, так как по собственному желанию покинул корабль.

В тот день в бою у [реки] Ялуцзян на нашем корабле было 7 убитых.

Не слишком ли рано отступил командир Фан и вернулся [в Люйшунь]?

Высшие сановники расследовали произошедшее и желали предать командира Фана публичной казни перед строем.

Узнав об этом, я бросился на квартиру к командиру Фану, желая застать его дома.

Но к этому времени тело и голова командира Фана уже были в разных местах (т.е. Фан Боцянь был обезглавлен – прим. А.П.).

После [казни] матросы с корабля пришили голову к телу и уложили его в гроб.

В этом бою японские корабли получили немало повреждений.

Так прошел второй бой.

Только непонятно, почему все военные корабли Наньянского флота заняли выжидательную позицию и не соединились с Бэйянским [флотом], чтобы [общими] силами разгромить японцев.

Это действительно нельзя объяснить!

Как видим, тут или журналисты накурились опиума, или Хоффман принял что-то крепче забортной воды... У него в бою при Пхундо появляется третий корабль в отряде - "Цаоцзян", который, на самом деле, в бою не участвовал, т.к. шел в Асан из Вэйхая с грузом артиллерийского имущества и армейской казной.

Ну и причина выхода "Цзиюань" из боя при Пхундо просто шикарна - мол, у нас все орудия вышли из строя... Прямо невезуха какая-то с орудиями на "Цзиюань", что вечно подтверждает один и тот же человек - Хоффман!

Также забавно, что, оказывается, корабль был поврежден не очень сильно, что орудия надо было снять с "Гуанъи", и что Хоффман по собственному желанию не отправился на это задание!

Вот как-то так. Ориентируйтесь на газеты - они пишут много умного, доброго, вечного...

 

#9 23.10.2016 16:03:39

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Несколько интересных заметок из одного номера одной американской газеты:

San Francisco Call, Volume 76, Number 80, 19 August 1894
http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&am … 940819.2.2

FAVORS JAPAN.
Stand of the King of Korea.
NOT LIKE A VASSAL.
The Suzerain Business Does Not Go.
FIGHTING THE CHINESE.
His Troops on the Field of Yashan.
SOME OF THEM BROKE AWAY.
But the Greater Part Stood Side by Side With the Men of the Mikado.

London, Aug. 18 —  dispatch to the Times from Tientsin says that the Northern Chinese squadron has vainly searched the Gulf of Pe-Chi-Li for Japanese war ships.
A dispatch to the Pall Mall Gazette from Seoul says a remarkable fact was revealed upon the occasion of the engagement between the Chinese and Japanese troops at Yashan, when the former were defeated. A number of Korean soldiers by special order of the King of Korea, accompanied the Japanese troops. Some of the Koreans fled when the fighting began, but the majority fought with the greatest of bravery. According to a Seoul dispatch this fact has high political significance, as showing the King of Korea sides with Japan. The Japanese legation has not received news from Japan to confirm the report that an imperial decree has been issued authorizing the raising of a Japan loan of $50,000,000. It was stated at the legation if a loan was repaired it would be entirely raised in Japan.

FIRST NAVAL BATTLE

Details of the Sinking of the Chinese Transport Kow Shing.

Yokohama, Aug. 7 – The following account of the naval engagement off Asan, supplied by the Tokio News Agency, is stated to have been received from a trust-worthy source: At 2 a.m. on the 25th ult, two Chinese war vessels – the Tsing-yuen and Kwang-yueh which had been lying for several days at In-Cheon, put to sea. Two hours afterward three Japanese war vessels also set out from the same port to ascertain the state of things in the neighborhood of Nam-yang. Nearing the island of Phung-do at little past 7 o’clock they perceived at a distance the two Chinese warships advancing toward them, and when the two squadrons approached each other the Chinese, instead if saluting the Japanese vessels, one of which was a flagship were observed to have their guns run out and their men at quarters.
The Japanese war vessels, on making this discovery, quickly effected preparations for an emergency. The Chinese soon afterward opened fire and the challenge was at once accepted by the Japanese whose shells soon began to tell upon the Chinese ships. The latter after a short while run up the Japanese ensign over a white flag, and this, being regarded as a declaration of surrender, the Japanese ships approached within a distance of about 300 meters, whereupon the Tsing-yuen treacherously discharged a torpedo against one of the Japanese ships and at same time recommenced firing. The Japanese vessels were equal to the occasion. They returned the fire vigorously.
While these things were in progress there have in sight another ship and a transport, both flying the flags of a neutral power. One of the Japanese war vessels instantly advanced to meet these new arrivals and found that although hoisting foreign flag, the war vessel belonged to the Chinese navy, while the transport had Chinese troops on board. These two vessels  notwithstanding the bunting they showed, fired upon the approaching Japanese ships, and a hot engagement began at once. Meanwhile, the Tsing-yuen and the Kwang-yueh, having received serious injury, steamed away, the former in the direction of China and the latter in that of Asan. The Japanese Vessels, instead of pursuing them, went to the assistance or the other Japanese warship fighting at a short distance off. The transport was soon sunk while the warship, namely the Tsang Kiang, hoisted a white flag. When the captured vessel had been taken possession of one of the Japanese ships started to follow the Tsing-yuen, but the latter, having a start of thirty or forty minutes, could not be easily overtaken. Consequently the pursuit was not successful. As to the Kwang-yueh, which fled in the direction of Asan, she is said to have been stranded and abandoned by the crew. The Shanghai papers assert that the sunken transport was conveying only 700 men to Korea. It is also stated that 50,000 men are to be landed at the Yalu River.
The Nichi Nichi gives the account of the sinking of the transport Kow Shung. The Japanese officer asked the captain if he would follow the Japanese man-of-war: the captain replied that he could only obey him. The officer then returned to his ship, and another signal to cast anchor was sent to Captain Galsworthy, who signaled back to the man-of-war to send a boat, as he wished to consult the Japanese. A boat was again sent to the transport; and the Japanese officer spoke to the captain at the gangway, and asked him why he wanted a boat. The captain replied he was himself anxious to obey the Japanese orders, but was prevented from doing so by the Chinese officers. The Chinese soldiers were in a foreign vessel and when the vessel left Taku the war had not been declared, and the captain wished now to return to China. The Japanese officer left him, promising to give a reply on reaching his ship. Soon after the man-of-war signaled "Leave the ship,", but the Kow Shing signaled back that the captain and officers were prevented. As there was no end to these negotiations, the Japanese man-of-war hoisted; the red flag on the foremast and gave the final warning to leave the ship immediately. The captain then instructed the engineers and other foreigners on board to come on deck. Immediately after the Japanese fired, and the captain and the other foreigners jumped into the sea and made for the island of Shopajoru. The Chinese officers on board the Kow Shing took up rifles and threatened to kill the captain and others if they left the ship, and when he and the others jumped in the sea they were greeted with a volley, but fortunately no one was hurt. The captain and the others were rescued by the Japanese man-of-war’s boats and were kindly received on the warship. The captain had only a shirt, a white jacket and a pair of drawers, while the officers and others were almost naked. They fully appreciate the will shown them by the Japanese man-of-war and are extremely angry at the threats of the Chinese troops. From these facts it would appear that the Japanese man-of-war first exercised its right of visit, and on seeing that Chinese troops were on board, was anxious to bring the ship with it, but the Chinese officers obstinately prevented the captain from following the man-of-war.

Nagasaki, Aug. 5. — Captain Galsworthy has arrived here, and his report of the Kow Shing affair is entirely in favor of the Japanese. He says the Kow Shing was not connected with the Chinese warships, and he has no knowledge of the naval fight, but, being helpless, he offered to surrender his vessel. To this the Chinese generals objected, and threatened his (Galsworthy’s) life. The Naniwa, after due warning, fired a torpedo, but this missed the object, whereupon broadside and machine guns were brought to bear upon the Kow Shing until she sank. All the Europeans and many of the Chinese jumped overboard, and these were fired upon by the Chinese who remained on board. The quartermaster is still under treatment at Sasebo for a wound in the neck, and Muhlenstedt is still a prisoner at Sasebo. The captain and mate are all right.

Вранье начинается с сообщения об участии корейских солдат в бою против китайцев. Потом перепутаны китайские корабли. Далее ряд "вкусных подробностей" о деле у Пхундо - например, что "Цаоцзян" нес иностранный флаг, или то, что "Цаоцзян" и "Гаошэн" открыли огонь по японцам...

Но источник-то, по словам газетчиков, "заслуживал доверия" (с)!

 

#10 30.10.2016 20:41:09

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Еще одно интервью Густава Германа Хоффмана:

BATTLE OFF THE YALU.

How it Looked to a Man on a Chinese Warship.

The North China Daily News of October 19 has the following: Mr. G. Hoffmann who was on board the Tsi Yuen during the fight off Yashan on the 26th of July, and at the battle near the Yalu on the 17th of September, is now in Shanghai on his way home, having resigned his position as chief superintending engineer in the Chinese navy. On Wednesday he was seen by a representative of the Daily News, to whom he gave some interesting information concerning the fights in which the Tsi Yuen had taken part.
In regard to the encounter of the 25th of July he distinctly states that the Japanese were the aggressors, three Japanese vessels meeting the Tsi Yuen and opening fire without any notice, although war was not declared until the 1st of August. The Tsi Yuen and Kuangyu left Yashan at about half-past 4 o’clock on the morning of the 25th of July, shaping a course for Wei-Hat- Wei. At about half-past 8 o’clock Mr. Hoffmann’s boy told him that three Japanese vessels were in sight. Looking through the window on the port side he saw the Japanese men-of-war, about 45 degrees to the fore, coming on in single line. The first was the Yoshino, but the others he did not know. They came on, and as soon as the leader was abreast of the Tsi Yuen the three simultaneously opened fire. Everything was then confusion on board the Tsi Yuen, as no preparations had been made for a fight, the sea lashings being on the guns, and no ammunition being up. It was about half an hour before the Tsi Yuen could return the fire. The Tsi Yuen had her steering gear badly damaged, and the two unknown Japanese vessels went off in pursuit of the Kuangyu and Tsaokiang, the latter of which was captured, while the former was run ashore. For quite an hour the Tsi Yueu fought the Yoshino, compelling the latter to withdraw with a good deal of damage. After effecting some sort of repairs the Yoshino again started after the Tsi Yuen firing some shots which went wide of the mark. At about half-past 12 the Yoshino came within 800 or 900 yards, and made preparations to discharge a torpedo. Meanwhile the Tsi Yueu was circling around at full speed, keeping her broadside from the Japanese vessel, thus rendering futile an attempt to use a torpedo. The Yoshino approached closer still, whereupon the Tsi Yuen’s aft gun, 15cm. Krupp, fired three rounds at her, hitting the Japanese vessel near the bridge and inflicting great damage. Upon this the Yoshino drew off toward the shore and the Tsi Yuen resumed her journey to Wei-Hai-Wei. Mr. Hoffmann speaks highly of the working of the Tsi Yuen, and he thinks it very creditable that she not only escaped from the superior Japanese force, but inflicted considerable damage upon the Yoshino as well. There were thirteen killed and twenty-three wounded on the Tsi Yuen, and it was an unfortunate fact that there was no doctor on board nor any provision made in the way of bandages. From Wei-Hai-Wei the Tsi Yuen went to Port Arthur to repair, remaining there about three weeks.
Mr. Hoffmann’s account of the battle of the Yalu on the 17th of September is noteworthy as being the first direct testimony we have yet had as to the doings of the Tsi Yuen on that day. It will be readily recalled that her commander, Captain Fong, has been decapitated for cowardice on that day, but Mr. Hoffmann's testimony tends to mitigate the weight of the accusation against the unfortunate officer, if it does not clear him altogether from blame. Mr. Hoffmann claims that the Tsi Yuen fought with courage, and it was not until her fore and after guns were disabled that Captain Fong withdrew. The only question was whether he withdrew at too early a stage. Mr. Hoffmann says that at about midday on the 17th of September orders were given to get up anchor, soon after which the Japanese came in sight and the fighting began. It was soon very difficult to make out what was going on. The Tsi Yuen’s guns were being fired very rapidly, and this ha believed was the cause of their getting out of order. When about thirty rounds had been fired from the 15-cm. Krupp alt-gun, the carriage went wrong, the turning-gear of the two forward (21-cm. Krupp) guns became jammed, so that the platform could not be turned. The Japanese gunners made very indifferent practice, and the Tsi Yuen did not receive much damage from them. Thinking he could do no more with his disabled guns, Captain Fong decided to withdraw, and he made the best of his way to Port Arthur, arriving there six hours before the rest of the fleet. His action was soon disapproved of, and when some of the damage sustained by the Tsi Yuen had been hastily repaired. Captain Fong was ordered to Talienwan Bay, to take the guns off the stranded Kuangchia, in which he did not succeed. Mr. Hoffmann refused to go in the ship in her then condition, and his connection with her ceased. Seven men were killed on the Tsi Yuen during the fight. Though admitting the seriousness of the guns being damaged, Mr. Hoffmann yet believed that Captain Fong made a mistake in leaving too soon. An inquiry was subsequently held into the case, the result of which was that Captain Fong was beheaded.

San Francisco Call, Volume 76, Number 181, 28 November 1894
http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&am … 941128.2.2

 

#11 02.11.2016 15:00:03

mish
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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Кое какие подробности, по Асану - самое начало боя.

http://stellarian.net/tmp/asan_01.jpg


Добро должно быть с огнеметом

 

#12 02.11.2016 15:11:32

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

mish написал:

#1104441
Кое какие подробности, по Асану - самое начало боя.

На каждом сайте со всякими газетами есть вариант скопировать текст в редактируемом виде и почистить его.

Вот эта корреспонденция полностью - ничего нового она не содержит:
The Argus (Melbourne), Oct. 19, 1894
http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/8715080

CHINA AND JAPAN
THE SITUATION ON THE YALU
POSITIONS OF THE TWO ARMIES
THE CHINESE PEACE PARTY SMALL
LONDON, OCT. l8.

The expected battle between the Chinese and Japanese forces in the vicinity of the Yalu River has not yet taken place. The headquarters of the Japanese are at Ping Yang, in Corea, where the Chinese army was annihilated on September 16, while the Chinese have fixed their headquarters at Kiuliencheng, on the Manchoorian side of the Yalu. The Japanese have established outposts on the left bank of that river. A general determination is expressed in China to fight out the quarrel to the bitter end. The party in favour of coming to terms with Japan and concluding a peace is small, and has little influence.

DESPATCH OF BRITISH SAILORS AND MARINES SENT VIA CANADA.
LONDON, OCT. l8.

The Government is taking further steps to strengthen the British naval forces in Chinese waters. Two hundred blue jackets and marines have been sent out to the China squadron by way of Canada.

PRINCE KUNG IN FAVOUR OF PEACE.
LONDON, OCT. 18, 10:30 A.M.

Prince Kung, uncle of the Emperor and formerly Regent of China, who was recently appointed coadjutor of Li Hung Chang, the Viceroy of Pe-chi-li, in the direction of the military and naval operations against Japan, is strongly urging that efforts should be made by China to bring about., peace between the two countries.

LATER DETAILS.
VARIOUS RUMOURS DENIED.
LONDON, OCT. l8.

It was recently reported that Li Hung Chang, the Viceroy of Pe-chi-li, had degraded his nephew, Sheng, the Governor of Tientsin, for corruption in purchasing a large number of worthless rifles from a German firm. The statement is now authoritatively denied. It is also denied that there is any truth in the report that a serious rebellion had broken out 100 miles from the treaty part of Hankow.
The Japanese admit that the statement that an army of 30,000 men left Hiroshima last month on a secret expedition was untrue. They assort that their object in giving currency to the story was to “bluff” the enemy. The newspapers express great indignation at the action of the belligerents in refusing to allow war correspondents to accompany their forces.

JAPANESE IMPORT DUTIES TO BE RAISED.
LONDON, Oct. l8.

In order to provide additional revenue for carrying on the war, Japan will shortly raise the duties on various imported articles.

A NAVAL ENGAGEMENT

The North China Herald of September 7 contains the following – “A private letter recently to hand, which has been kindly placed at our disposal, gives some further details, which are Zolaesque in their realism, concerning the notion between the Tsiyuen and Kuangyu and the Japanese men of war. The affair is described as a straight bolt on the part of the Tsiyuen from the first, and it was only an accident to the machinery of the Yoshino which prevented her from taking the Chinese vessel a prisoner or sinking her. Three Japanese men of war opened fire at about hall past 8 a.m. on the Tsiyuen, which at once started for Weihaiwei. One of the Japanese vessels left to look after the Kowshing whilst another went to engage the Kuangyu. The last named, after bring all her ammunition – 100 rounds – started for the shore, and all bands endeavoured to escape. By the time she was almost a wreck a shell came through the shield of her port broadside quick-firing gun, killed the men working it and passed over to the starboard side, where it caused similar havoc. After leaving the wreck the Japanese returned and fired 13 rounds into her one of winch exploded a torpedo in her after torpedo room blowing the whole after part away. On board the Tsiyuen, the first lieutenant was in the act of giving an order through a speaking tube when a shot passed right through the conning tower and blew off his head. When the Tsiyuen reached port his teeth and a portion of his mouth were still hanging in the mouthpiece of the tube. The steam pipe of the Tsiyuen’s steam steering gear was shot away during the first part of the engagement and the foreign engineer had to come out of the engine room, run along the ‘tween decks go down the forward stokehole and shut the steam valve. As he was rushing along he fell over the terribly mangled remains of a stoker, who after coming off watch had gone to sleep on the decks and was killed by one of the first shots. The Japanese are said to have fired very badly when attacking the Tsiyuen, most of their shots being too high".

Отредактированно Nie-junmen (02.11.2016 16:50:32)

 

#13 21.07.2017 16:01:43

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

http://i066.radikal.ru/1707/b5/b1746ebc13fft.jpg  "Дележ пирога", подведение итогов войны.


REMEMBER THE GOOD OLD NAVY

 

#14 30.01.2018 07:38:00

rkbob
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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

ощущение что японские матросы топят корабли противника с помощью магии...
https://a.radikal.ru/a12/1801/4e/12560c1fb42at.jpg

 

#15 30.01.2018 10:39:35

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Strannik4465 написал:

#1188068
Дележ пирога", подведение итогов войны.

Мимо.

Это начало Боксерского кризиса (1898-1901).

rkbob написал:

#1245244
ощущение что японские матросы топят корабли противника с помощью магии...

Судя по надписи на лубке - торпедами:

Изображение [того как] миноносец нашего ВМФ атакует и топит вражеский корабль

Правда, что такое торпеда, художник мог и не знать, поэтому меч обязательно присутствует (а вдруг?).

 

#16 31.01.2018 21:56:51

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Nie-junmen написал:

#1245289
Правда, что такое торпеда, художник мог и не знать, поэтому меч обязательно присутствует (а вдруг?).

Торпедные аппараты изображены достаточно правдоподобно, но вот сам миноносец напоминает миниатюрную "поповку".


The damned tin can destroyer was never meant for sea!...

 

#17 01.02.2018 10:04:19

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Dilandu написал:

#1245920
Торпедные аппараты изображены достаточно правдоподобно, но вот сам миноносец напоминает миниатюрную "поповку".

Есть 2 разновидности японского лубка - есть довольно реалистичные вещи (с долей фантазии, но все же), и есть - голимая фантазия.

Этот из 2-й категории.

Художники на фронте не были, рисовали по заданию, основанном на словесном описании (как правило). Вот и результат. А китайцев еще и старались представить в виде тупых смешных варваров, что было довольно легко по причине их не-европейской формы и довольно "странного" поведения ряда цинских военачальников.

 

#18 01.02.2018 10:07:48

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Nie-junmen написал:

#1246044
Есть 2 разновидности японского лубка - есть довольно реалистичные вещи (с долей фантазии, но все же)

Простите, а пример можно?
Помню, мне как то подарили японский альбом японской батальной миниатюры средневековой японии. Сколько часов провел над ним созерцая и наслаждаясь, зачастую с лупой :)


Англичане-идиоты (с)
Еслиб не было травы, мир бы скучным был, увы. (С) Малышарики.

Люди приходят и уходят... Я думаю все дело в ногах...(С)

 

#19 01.02.2018 13:08:24

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

1

РыбаКит написал:

#1246046
Простите, а пример можно?

"[Захваченный]"Чжэньюань" осматривают", Огата Гэкко, 1895:
https://b.radikal.ru/b01/1802/3a/61d82b0f95df.jpg

Тот же сжет, Цутия Коицу, 1895:
https://a.radikal.ru/a01/1802/ab/d5d9cffc040d.jpg

"Бой и захват Хайяндао (Ялу)", Огата Гэкко, 1895 г.:
https://b.radikal.ru/b15/1802/83/9a2d9dfcc8f5.jpg

Показано прохождение корвета "Хиэй" между китайскими броненосцами.

В целом - довольно реалистично.

 

#20 06.02.2018 09:42:47

ринат гимадеев
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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Должен заметить, что к "мировой прессе" относятся и российские СМИ :

Спойлер :

И, хотя, книга вышла ещё в советское время и не избавлена от идеологических штампов, но надо отметить, что с объективной точки зрения, трактовка верная, т.к. РИ действительно была заинтересована в спокойствии в сопредельных ей странах, но при этом, не отказывалась от своих экспансионистских планов. Р.S. Извиняюсь за общие слова и отсутствие конкретных примеров из российских газет того времени, т.к. данный пост написан только лишь для того, чтобы подчеркнуть тот факт, что российские СМИ и тогда входили в разряд мировых и продолжают входить и поныне.

Отредактированно ринат гимадеев (06.02.2018 09:52:33)


"Устами младенца глаголет Истина" - парафраз цитаты из Псалма Давида 8:3 (раввинский перевод): "Из уст младенцев и грудных детей Ты утвердил крепость перед врагами Твоими, чтобы остановить врага и мстителя".

 

#21 06.02.2018 13:29:02

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

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ринат гимадеев написал:

#1247725
данный пост написан только лишь для того, чтобы подчеркнуть тот факт, что российские СМИ и тогда входили в разряд мировых и продолжают входить и поныне.

Только вот что ни сделают расейские СМИ - все верят иностранным. И у нас "думающая либеральная публика", и в мире - как простые буржуа, так и главные буржуины.

 

#22 06.02.2018 23:38:45

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Nie-junmen написал : "Только вот что ни сделают расейские СМИ - все верят иностранным. И у нас "думающая либеральная публика", и в мире - как простые буржуа, так и главные буржуины."(с) -  В СССР не только "либеральная публика" слушала по радио "вражеские голоса", но и все те, кто имел такую возможность. Например, начальник полит.отдела соединения, где я служил был мною застигнут за прослушиванием "забугорных" новостей по личному "ВЭФ" экспортного варианта, где не было ограничений диапазонов. Но, надо заметить, что это происходило в период учений "Запад-81"*, которые, кроме всего прочего, имели целью воздействовать на ПНР, где активизировалась "Солидарность". И нач.по объяснил, что ему необходимо знать инсинуации капиталистов для контрпропаганды. Что же касается недоверия общества к отечественным СМИ, то, по-моему, есть несколько вариантов, объясняющие данный феномен. Например, на выбор : "Доверяй, но проверяй", "Всё врут календари" и т.д. и т.п. Однако, должен заметить, что "Нет пророка в своём отечестве" - это правило. Можно напомнить о предупреждении адмирала С.О.Макарова в отношении нападения самураев. Впрочем, прогнозировать сие ему, как говорится, сам Нептун ( Посейдон ) велел. А что писали в российских СМИ ? Имеется ввиду, периодика ( журналы ), где печатались произведения, которые потом выходили отдельными изданиями ( книгами ) :

Спойлер :

И, если вышеуказанные сочинения были, образно говоря, "играми патриотов" и их не принимали всерьёз, то это

Спойлер :

были уже "военный игры" и на их основании разрабатывались стратегические планы... *Примечание :

Спойлер :

К сему : и я имел честь участвовать в этой грандиозной по масштабам демострации военной мощи Советского Союза. Хотя, должен заметить, что рад тому, что не последовал приказ "Перейти границу !"

Отредактированно ринат гимадеев (06.02.2018 23:41:02)


"Устами младенца глаголет Истина" - парафраз цитаты из Псалма Давида 8:3 (раввинский перевод): "Из уст младенцев и грудных детей Ты утвердил крепость перед врагами Твоими, чтобы остановить врага и мстителя".

 

#23 09.03.2018 18:16:16

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Nie-junmen написал:

#1246127
Тот же сжет, Цутия Коицу, 1895:

А можно с большим разрешением? У Вас ведь есть, наверное.


"Советской мичуринской науке так и не удалось скрестить инженера с офицером. Получается либо одно, либо другое..."(с) капитан 1 ранга Милованов.

 

#24 09.03.2018 19:45:26

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

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Цутия Коицу (土屋光逸 ) "収容軍艦鎮遠縦覧之圖" (Изображение осмотра захваченного военного корабля "Тинъэн"), английский вариант названия - "Scene of the Public Display of a Captured Warship", август 1895:
https://d.radikal.ru/d32/1803/ac/7bab0a6dc710.jpg

Немного побольше, но не радикально.

 

#25 12.03.2018 20:10:41

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Re: Освещение японо-китайской войны в мировой прессе

Спасибо


"Советской мичуринской науке так и не удалось скрестить инженера с офицером. Получается либо одно, либо другое..."(с) капитан 1 ранга Милованов.

 

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